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I whipped this up in an hour at a cafe table while my son slept. Needless to say it’s another “don’t look too closely project”. But I’m sure the little girl it’s intended for will love it.  Makes me think of doing more…maybe with real felt.  My son liked the  felt in the craft shop and picked out an orange and blue combo, so I’ll make him a crown too. But I think I’d love to do some super duper embroidered crowns on beautiful woollen felt.

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I’m really happy with the way this turned out.  This one is for me but I’ll definitely be making some more. I have used little seed pearls for buttons, which I like very much.

I need to practice my bars a bit and neaten up my stitches. But overall, I’m happy.

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Pulling gently…hooray!  No stitches had gone through the base fabric when I wasn’t looking. It all came away pretty cleanly.

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Today I’ve taken advantage of the break in the weather to block it using some home made starch. I found this recipe online and added some inessence harmony essential oil.

I tried to find my unmarkable mat, but it’s been packed away somewhere, so I improvised with a some baking paper over a towel.  I liked it because you could press into it to give some of the pieces a three dimensional shape.

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Starched some other little shapes as well. The two dark blue ones at the bottom are the ones I’ve moulded into a depression in the towel. I hope they turn out.

Wow…I had Mahler’s symphony no.1 playing….way too heavy for lace making. I’ve swapped it for a beautiful Jaqueline Du Pre’ cd.

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Here we are.  All finished. I think I might need to block it a bit, (you don’t say!) when I cut it off. I also need to find some little buttons, or beads, or pearls , (even better),  for the buttonholes.

But of course the big question is…together hold together when I release it?  (Well, it’s a big question to me anyhow, after all those hours of work. There are of course bigger questions. )

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It looked as though the wave was going  to become lost in the background so I used some insertion stitches underneath it.  I think it adds more definition but as well as that,  it reminded me of old wharf posts that the sea crashes around. So I was quite happy with this variation on my original idea.

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I’ve started the filling stitches for the lace cuff. I really like the whip stitching in the bottom section of this pic.  Whipping the stitches seems to allow them to even out a bit.  The wave itself is double Brussels stitch and it seems to be forming a diamond pattern down the centre….so I’m wondering…is this a wave or a tentacle?  Corded Brussels stitch is used in the top sections. It seems to form little triangles for me…. Not sure if it’s meant to, but I kind of like a little geometry within the flowing forms.

Lace cuff - The wave

 

The beginnings of what is intended to be a lace cuff.  I’m using the cordonet method because it’s so large a piece.  I think I’ve connected everything up alright.  I’ve used at he back of a piece of Christmas material for the base. (Can you see the little christmas bears?) It has really heaving sizing on it so the needle doesn’t get caught when I pass it under the stitches.   I like the design.  I’m hoping to use a number of different stitches but not so complicated that the design is lost.

Inspiration from a friend

I’m very happy with the pairing of a hemp cord with the temari ball pendants. I’ve been trying to find something that worked with them for ages. A silver chain just didn’t seem to do it. Inspiration came from a friend couple of weeks ago who, on receiving a necklace asked if I’d mind if she put it on a longer chain. Then it all seemed to come together in my mind. Love it when that happens….could it have happened sooner though? Or is it just at the right time as I open up my etsy shop.

I’m in one of my favourite haunts again and I’ve been practicing my needle lace using the cordonet method. It is definitely trickier to keep  the outline in shape using this method, but the payoff is the variety of stitches that are more easily accomplished without pins to get in the way of your needle.

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One thing about doing a lot of embroidery in a workspace of  public places,  is that the work itself has to be small in scale.  So lately I’m thinking about components.  Components and needle lace.

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This is a small piece worked in a circle using pins to hold the outline.  I love how it starts off as a circle, gets all out of shape when it gets pulled around with the filling stitch…

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And then transforms back into a circle again when the edging is done.  Please note the teapot,  a vital piece of my cafe style work environment.

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I think the three circles together would look good linked as a necklace.

There is a lot to learn about needle lace and I found  great instructions here at the lacemakers lace site.  Which just happens to be an Australian site, I found out after browsing through the pages.   I haven’t used the traditional method , as you can see.  But I find using pins on a material covered foam base supportive enough for small shapes.

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